Tag Archives: D major

Won’t Go Away


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This song uses a lot of repeated right hand patterns played over a left hand chord progression. Measure 21-27 is a good example. Each measure of the right hand starts with a chord played twice, and then a syncopated chord part that is the same in each measure (except m. 24 has an A-sharp). The fast intro at measure 5 is another example of this pattern technique.

A Thousand Lives


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This is one of the first songs I wrote when I went to college. I actually wrote this on an acoustic guitar, but it translates well to the piano. It’s a straightforward pop/rock song in the key of D-major. The bridge at measure 34 is probably the most challenging part. At measure 50, the left hand switches to treble clef and the right hand has an 8va dotted line above it which means, “play this up an octave.”

Tell Me


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After the arpeggio intro, the left hand switches to treble clef at measure 9. The right hand has a grace note at the beginning of measure 13. This note should be played immediately before the F#. Measure 25-40 is just like the previous section, but everything has been moved down one octave. Also, the left hand has been changed back to bass clef. The song changes direction at measure 41 and you should make this section louder. Up to this point the sustain pedal has been optional, but you will want to use it for this section to create a full sound.

Hit Or Miss


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Just one sharp in the key signature. However, there are a lot of accidentals so pay attention to whether it is F-sharp or F-natural.

This upbeat rock song requires a pretty strong left hand, especially the thumb and pinky. For example, the opening bass line uses mostly thumb and pinky.

Measures 5-12 is probably the easiest section of the song. Pay attention to the rests in the left hand. Remember, rests are just as important as notes because they give the music space and anticipation.

Look at the right hand in measures 25-32. As you play this part, give more emphasis to the higher notes because they move up and down. The lower notes of the right hand just stay on D the whole time so you don’t need to play them as loudly.

Measures 33-40 is the hardest section of this song. Eventually, you want to be able to play very loudly with both hands. However, I recommend that you practice quietly at first so you can save your hand strength while you’re still learning the notes.

You only need to use the sustain pedal for sections like measure 33-40. The other sections are optional and it really depends on what you think sounds best.

Just Like That


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This song has two sharps in the key signature. That means we need to change every F into an F# and every C into a C#. You won’t see a big sharp sign in front of every F note and every C note, you just have to remember.

The right hand in measures 1-16 is easy to learn because it uses the same rhythm again and again. Remember that a dotted quarter note gets one and a half beats.

For measures 17-24, reset the sustain pedal every measure. For measures 25-40, reset the pedal every 2 measures.

The left hand is really stretched out in measures 25-40. The sustain pedal will help you out though because it will continue to hold the notes while you reposition your hand.