Tag Archives: E minor

Flip The Switch


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This is actually a combination of two songs. I realized that I had written two separate pieces in a similar tempo and style, but neither one was that great. I took the best parts of both and made it into a single composition. Watch your hand coordination in measure 37-44. Both hands play the exact same thing, but the right hand is two beats behind the left hand. This part sounds even better if you hold the sustain pedal down the entire time and gradually crescendo.

Rivalry


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The opening section consists of a single note bass line and an arpeggiated melody. The left hand is very simple, but the right hand has a lot of movement. Reset the sustain pedal about every two measures to fill out the sound. We get new material at measure 19. The left hand changes to a quarter and eighth rhythm to help give the song some momentum. The right hand has a new melody along with some chords for emphasis. The rest of the song is similar. Everything is moved up an octave in measure 33. Measure 65 to the end is the strongest section with the left hand in octaves on the downbeat of each measure.

Smoke Screen


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This is a latin-jazz tune in E minor. I’m not very familiar with latin-jazz, so consider this song an educated guess. It uses common chord progressions like a descending bass (m. 1) and the circle of 5ths (m. 10). Lots of syncopation throughout, so read the rhythms closely. On the chorus (m. 26), the left hand holds out a few notes and also plays quarter notes in the bass. This type of accompaniment provides a full sound, but also a sense of forward motion.

You’re In Trouble


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This song has a lot of back and forth between the right hand and the left hand. That means that one hand is playing while the other is resting or holding a long note. This type of song will help develop your hand independence because you can focus on one hand at a time.

Measures 81-88 should start softly and then get gradually louder. Measure 89-98 should be the loudest part of the whole song, so when you get to this spot, give it everything that you’ve got.

If you’re looking for a way to make this song harder, you can play the right hand in octaves in places like measures 25-32. I would suggest that you play the part that I’ve written with your right hand pinky (5th finger) and then add an octave below with your thumb. (1st finger)

Red Eye


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This song has one sharp in the key signature. That means we need to change every F into an F#. You won’t see a big sharp sign in front of every F note, you just have to remember.

Measures 45-52 use a left hand pattern that repeats over and over. The pattern itself isn’t too hard. The hard part is switching quickly between chords. You don’t want it to sound like there’s a “hiccup” in your left hand every time you have to switch to a new chord.

I wrote in the recommended fingering for measure 55, and it will be the same for measure 59. If you don’t how finger numbers work, look at this lesson.

Use the sustain pedal for most of this song. You’ll want to reset it every measure, except in those few spots where the chord changes in the middle of the measure. (ex. measure 20)