Tag Archives: F major

Lead You Home


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The opening measures have a lot of fast sixteenth notes and this is probably the most difficult section in this song. I recommend slowing this part way down to figure out exactly how the hands work together. At measure 11 we get a simple verse with a single note bass. The chorus at measure 19 continues with the same left hand rhythm, but we add some chord tones in both hands to fill out the sound. I decided to take the song in a completely different direction at measure 42. I changed to a faster tempo and introduced a new melody that would remain for the rest of the song. This dramatic change of tempo is not something I do very often, but I think it’s effective here.

Let’s Pretend


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The main melody is introduced at the beginning with some simple chords. Make sure the left hand doesn’t cover up the melody. The melody is repeated in measures 10-17 with a more complex accompaniment. Pay attention to which way the stems are pointing. This will help you understand how all the parts work together. Measure 44-51 is the same as the beginning, but everything has been moved up one octave. Also, the left hand changes to treble clef for this section.

Too Much And Too Soon


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This song is in 6/8 time, which gives it a triplet feel. Remember that there are 6 beats in each measure and every eighth note is one beat. Use the sustain pedal at measure 41 to help connect the left hand chords. Measure 57 should start softly and then gradually crescendo to measure 72.

Either Way


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This song is in triple meter and has a time signature of 3/4. I’m pretty sure I could have written it in 6/8 as well, but 3/4 feels a little simpler to me. I don’t write in triple meter very much though, so I’m still figuring out the different accompaniment patterns I can use. Be sure to listen to the video to get a sense of the dynamics. For example, the right hands notes during the intro are not all played with the same volume. The downbeat is emphasized and the other two seem to echo away. I use this echo effect at several different spots throughout the song.

The Next Red Light


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This song has one flat in the key signature. That means we need to change every B into a B-flat. You won’t see a big flat sign in front of every B note, you just have to remember.

The opening part is repeated several times throughout the song. Sometimes this part is played in a higher octave (measures 1-8), and sometimes it’s played in a lower octave (measures 25-32), but the music remains the exact same.

The hardest part of the song comes at measures 65-80. The left hand is just “power chords” played in an eighth note rhythm. The right hand melody is similar to measures 9-24, but it’s been moved up an octave and I’ve added chord tones underneath the melody.