Tag Archives: G major

Knock Knock


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The song starts with a solo melody line that is answered with a short bass riff. Things get going at measure 10 with some harmony and a steady beat in the left hand. The bass riff should be loud each time, but you can back off for the low quarter notes in the left hand. Measure 22-29 is a handful. Practice each hand separately and then combine them at a slow tempo. The next new section begins at measure 58. Emphasize the right hand melody, while keeping the left hand soft and bouncy. Back to the chorus at measure 72 with the right hand taking it up an octave at measure 76.

One Thing Leads To Another


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This song is in the key of G-major, with one sharp in the key signature. The beginning should be played softly using the sustain pedal. A simple melody is introduced at measure 10 and then harmonized at measure 18 along with a jumping pattern in the left hand. The chorus at measure 26 puts the right hand in octaves with a driving left hand bass. The downbeat of each measure is emphasized with a heavy, full chord. For this section, focus on the accuracy of the right hand as it jumps between registers as well as the accent marks of the left hand to lay the proper rhythmic foundation.

Something To Believe


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This song should be played with a heavy swing. That means, instead of playing the eighth notes evenly, you make the strong beats longer and the weak beats shorter. That might be a little confusing, but listen to the song and you will get a feel for it. The chorus at measure 26-42 is the most difficult section. The left hand plays a few bass runs to give the song momentum, while the right hand fills out the sound with punchy chords.

Something Amazing


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In measures 1-8, the right hand is actually playing in octaves and filling in with chord tones at the same time. This is a common technique in piano, but it can be difficult if your hand isn’t used to stretching like that. Measures 50-57 should be practiced slowly at first and then gradually sped up. For this section, the left hand is written in the treble clef and does a lot of “filling in.” That means it plays mostly on the off beats and “fills in” the gaps of the right hand part.

Say Yes


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This is a combination of two songs. I tried to take the best elements of both and put them together. It’s a simple, relaxing song in G major. Things get a little more challenging at measure 33 with the right hand arpeggios. The left hand takes the melody at measure 43 and then passes back to the right hand octaves.