Tag Archives: G major

First Time For Everything


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Click here for the free sheet music

A lot of my music is in 4/4 time. There’s nothing wrong with that, but I thought I’d write something in 3/4 time to change things up. This song is in the key of G-Major and has a bit of waltz feel to it. The sustain pedal is your friend in this song, especially for the “bass-chord-chord” pattern in the left hand (like at measure 5.) The left hand actually has the melody at measure 49 and continues until the opening section returns at measure 65.

New Day In The City


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Click here for the free sheet music

This song is in the key of G-major with one sharp in the key signature. However, there are a lot of F-naturals in this song as well because of accidentals.

The verse of this song (measures 6-20) is pretty easy. The left hand has a syncopated accompaniment pattern. This syncopation gives this song a little attitude, a little swagger. The right hand has a single note melody line with mostly eighth notes and sixteenth notes.

The chorus of this song (measures 21-33) is a more challenging. The right hand, in addition to the top note melody, uses chord tones to fill out the sound. The left hand changes to a slightly different accompaniment pattern.

The chorus should be louder than the verse, and should have a bit more punch to it. Pay attention to the staccato notes in the chorus. They indicate which notes should be played short.

Fine By Me


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Click here for the sheet music

This song is swung, so the eight notes are not played evenly. For the intro, the right hand just has bouncy quarter note chords, but notice how the left hand jumps the beat. The left hand is syncopated for the intro with most of the notes being played on the weak beat.

Measures 5-10 is very chromatic with lots of accidentals and an ascending bass line. There’s one sharp in the key signature, and you need to pay special attention to how the accidentals change throughout the measures.

Measures 10-12 is one of the harder spots in this song, especially the right hand. This part is repeated again, although slightly different, in measures 18-20. Try learning just the right hand part first and then add the left hand later.

Measures 21-28 are a little easier, and you might want to play this section slightly louder just to add some contrast.

Just One More Time


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Click here to print or download the sheet music

This song has one sharp in the key signature. That means we need to change every F into an F#, except in places like measure 15 where it is specifically marked as F-natural.

There’s something else in measure 15 that’s worth pointing out. Look at the right hand notes that are bracketed with a number 3 underneath them. These is a triplet. In this case, you are play three notes in the space of two beats. Listen for this in the video to hear how it sounds.

Use the pedal to help connect notes and fill out the sound, especially starting at measure 27. I thinks it’s harder to maintain a steady beat with a slow song like this one. Try not to rush the tempo too much while you play this.

I’ll Know When I Get There


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Click here to print or download the sheet music

The hardest part of this song is the riff that is used over and over. It first appears at measures 5-8. The right is ok, but the left hand is tough. Practice this part really slowly and notice how both hands interact with each other. The left hand “fills in” all of the spaces that the right hand isn’t playing.

The left hand at measure 23 isn’t as hard as it looks. You just hold the notes as you play them. Usually the left hand plays from the bottom to the top, so it might be a different feeling playing from the top to the bottom.

Measures 55-58, is the same thing you’ve been playing throughout the whole song. Everything has just been moved up one octave.